Brooks Park
7 min readAug 9, 2020

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Moralist Authoritarianism

Part One: An Assault on Freedom of Consciousness

The War on Drugs was officially waged by Nixon, but prohibition of certain psychoactive substances began in the early years of the twentieth century. Greed, ambition, and racism are easy to spot as the fuel which launched the prohibition of drugs. Drugs identified as those favored by non-white ethnic groups were initially targeted.

Additionally, the campaign of prohibition was forwarded by an oppressive current of influence which haunts America. Since Europeans first invaded the shores of this once pristine land, an imposing demographic has resided in America.

Beginning with the Puritans, there has been an element of the American worldview with imposing influence. This aspect of American culture is moralist authoritarianism.

Moralist authoritarianism is a scourge which threatens liberty and happiness, using oppression and repression to coerce others to comply with their agenda.

A moralist is someone who imposes upon others their values and accepted behaviors. Often easily offended by opposing views, or even inquiry into the legitimacy of those views, the moralist demands that others subscribe to their beliefs regarding right and wrong. The moralist is so confident in the validity of those beliefs that their conviction goes unexamined, and the moralist assumes his beliefs to be absolute and singularly correct.

Moralists believe that if it was right a thousand years ago, it remains so today. Why? So frequently these beliefs are based upon religious ideas which espouse a doctrine of a one true God; sin (especially original sin); human nature as flawed and imperfect; pleasure as a threat; unquestioned surrender to God’s will the only acceptable directive; salvation from the human condition as requisite for a (truly) happy and moral life; a spiritual hierarchy with God reigning supreme, angels carrying out his bidding, faithful humans as his earthly representatives tasked with imposing worship of God on others; humans who doubt or disbelief dismissed as pitied wretches (source of self-righteousness by the faithful), animals meeting human needs (to labor and be eaten), and natural resources at the bottom. Moralists not only subscribe to this belief system, but want everybody else to as well. Armed with the belief that they possess alliance with the only true view, they are relentless in their persistence to convince others to accept their views. Examples of moralists are the…

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Brooks Park

Mystical Hedonist; Drug Geek; Psychonaut. Prone to irreverent social commentary.