Rehab Causes Addiction: The Reciprocal Relationship of the War on Drugs and Addiction Treatment

Brooks Park
6 min readAug 9, 2020

Introduction:

Raging through our communities, the opioid epidemic has left a trail of death and destitution in its wake. As the number of deaths increase at an unprecedented rate, this drug epidemic has surpassed all others in its lethality. No previous epidemic has claimed lives like the opioid epidemic; by both overdose death and the ruinous effects on the lives of the addicted.

Photo by Neil Thomas on Unsplash

As the deadly shockwaves of opioid addiction rip through lives, desperate cries for solutions grow louder.

Drug prohibition, and the War on Drugs, sprang from the moralist authoritarianism agenda; the racism, which drove early drug prohibition, was steeped in the arrogance of white supremacy which assumed moral superiority.

As our country is ravaged by the opioid crisis, the cry for increased access to treatment in lieu of incarceration grows louder. Ostensibly this is the more rational, more humane approach. However, the War on Drugs and rehab share a symbiotic relationship which functions to coerce drug users into accepting and submitting (to the stigmatized social role assigned by moralist authoritarianism).

Rehab is often thought of as a kinder, medical approach for treating addiction. In actuality, 90% (or more) of rehabs are indoctrination centers of moralist authoritarianism. Standard approaches more closely resemble re-education or thought reform centers than medical or mental health facilities. Most rehabs have curriculums based on AA and Prohibitionist propaganda. The objective, rather than prioritizing an individuals need for fulfillment and authenticity, is to indoctrinate them into the AA belief system. Due to the rigid guidelines mandated by these programs, residents are conditioned to relent, without hesitation or question, to the moralist authoritarianism root of both the War on Drugs and rehabs. Submission rather than assertion are promoted.

First we will review the history of drug prohibition, then the history of recovery and treatment in America. The perpetuation of one another and their foundation in moralist authoritarianism will be examined. Then I will introduce a more realistic view of drugs and “addiction”, followed by a route to…

Brooks Park

Mystical Hedonist; Drug Geek; Psychonaut. Prone to irreverent social commentary.